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have the editorial director of india today, and a very big star blasters program, i enjoyed our encounter last year and expects similar feistiness, m.j. akbar. finally, we have paul madison, who is commander of the navy. thank you for joining us. when i was thinking about the title today and thinking about our panel, it occurred to me and i went online to find a chinese event is being held right now. there are no canadians, japanese, americans, on this panel. we don't have any chinese today, but we should have a lot of fun discussing strategy in asia pacific region with china, but i also want to acknowledge that that voice may not be with us today, but that could be giving us room to run. i went to china and visited with the ministry of foreign affairs and i met with their director and the finally said i cannot understand what the grand strategy is. this was about 2004. and i said, what is your grand strategy? and it was how to keep you guys distracted. [laughter] that seems to be shifting. one of the very interesting things, i know this is not a u.s. panel, but just two days ag
right now. we have strengthened our ties with india. the indian prime minister paying a visit to washington in 2009 was the official state visit. we have the strategic dialogue with india. we see india as a partner for the 21st century and welcome their effort to look east and play a larger role in asia, including the indian ocean. at the same time, we of help realize indonesia's potential as a global partner. there is an excellent relationship between the prime minister and the president. it has been a terrific partnership. third line of the effort, promoting regional cooperation, peaceful resolution of disputes and adherence to human-rights and international law. at a global level, the president strongly supported making the g-20 in the international forum for economic cooperation. this brought a into global economic decision making. -- asia into global economic decision making. president obama became the first u.s. president to join the east asia summit last year in bali. he will participate again this coming week in cambodia. this stress is a critically important aspect of
collide as coffee culture comes now to india. [ woman ] ring. ring. progresso. i just finished a bowl of your new light chicken pot pie soup and it's so rich and creamy... is it really 100 calories? let me put you on webcan... ...lean roasted chicken... and a creamy broth mmm i can still see you. [ male announcer ] progresso. you gotta taste this soup. [ male announcer ] a european-inspired suspension, but not from germany. ♪ a powerful, fuel-efficient engine, but it's not from japan. ♪ it's a car like no other... inspired by a place like no other. introducing the all-new 2013 chevrolet malibu, our greatest malibu ever. ♪ >>> in a country where tea is deeply rooted in the culture, does india really stand a chance? we go to mumbai to find out. ♪ >> reporter: most people in india wake up to this every morning, a cup of chai, steaming, sweet, and milky. >> i think the lines are already starting. people are calling. >> there is a buzz. >> yeah, there is a buzz. >> reporter: one man believes that's changing. howard schultz, founder and ceo of the world's largest coffee chain, has p
there are good guys and bad guys, but there are guys the pakistans supports, the guys that india has supported, the russia has intended -- >> india is a big player here, fareed. because if you look through indian history from the guptas to the mull rans, the moguls, the dynasty, others, what you see is for many periods of indian history or subcontinent history, the same empire that controlled the northern third of india also controlled most of pakistan and half of afghanistan, so afghanistan is not foreign to india. it's part of the sub continental conflict system. so we can leave afghanistan, the u.s. can. but india, you will always have deep equities there and if we desert afghan precipitously, you might see india moving closer diplomatically to russia in order to contain things there, in order to make sure afghanistan does not become just a radical islamic extension of pakistani isi control. >> so we are on track in the united states to withdraw from afghanistan over the next two years. tell us what -- what emerges as we withdraw. >> what emerges is that iran will have much greater influenc
of his war policy, it would not reach those people. in annual growth in india of 1%. indians understand what this order was all about. they wanted the confusion of independence. from may, 1947 is important because it is the modern 1776. america is the oldest country of the modern world. the american constitution provided us with the template for classless democracy. it was not achieved immediately, but it was the template. india is important in 1947 because india is the oldest nation of the post-colonial world. the indian constitution creates an ideological template for democracy. with the emergence of india, china had a different template. very interesting, we see these comparisons, two parties, congress and the chinese communist party, became the dominant force in the post independents space. both had to be discriminated because both came from economically driven needs. the chinese offered autocratic left. but had karimov -- charismatic leaders. long story short,ke i i'm waiting for the short part. >> just a little bit longer. both had charismatic leaders, but i [indiscernible] but re
stay ahead of the growth. instead of trying to catch up and make order out of chaos. >> trucks in india averaged just 21 kilometers per hour. that makes transporting perishable food a big challenge. public transport systems are also out of date. cities like delhi are growing too quickly. >> innovative transportation concepts are required to prevent cities from collapse, but only a few asian cities have already laid ground to cope with future needs. >> one theme at the asia-pacific conference of german business is that the infrastructure of asian cities needs to be completely reexamined. everything from roads to electricity. >> there is not enough capacity for power generation here. that has to be improved, and in the delivery of electricity, there are losses of up to 25% between the power station and the customer. >> german companies hope to play a role in upgrading and expanding the infrastructure. >> still to come, who are the next rulers of china? >> and how a german university is relocating to the red sea. >> we will be back in one minute with more. >> stick around. >> welcome back.
and solar makes no sense. refi china and india and other emerging economies would sign nine so to reduce emissions i don't take a position nine whether man-made emissions cause global warming and i it china and india to make up 37% of the population not doing so. and the first chapter the book i talk about geo engineering solutions win to think we could reduce global temperatures by just came roofs white to reflect the race. what we're doing with a 12 billion-dollar hours it is pushing people into cars they do not want to buy raising your much as a cost we are getting rid of incandescent light bulbs and disproportionately those zero least able to afford it the lowest fifth of and come distribution spend 24 percent of income on electricity natural-gas and gasoline. that's right. spending on energy and compared to an average of 7%. it it is just strange well-intentioned people who purport to represent advocates policies that will do them harm rather than a good british edition to hurricane the uproar industrial policies to promote solar and wind undesirable to create opportunities for poli
to the rebels. and that india has executed the sole surviving gunman from the 2008 bombe attacks -- bombay attacks. he was hanged in a prison in india. he was one of 10 gunman who launched terrorist attacks four years ago this month, killing 166 people. >> time to get to sports now. in soccer, there was a full slate of champions league group stage games tuesday night. in group f, bayern munich split the points with valencia, meaning they are through to the knockout states. >> in group, barcelona was victorious. >> chelsea's defeat has led the team put the chances of regression hanging by a thread. >> no wonder then that the club has set its coach. he only took over the team back in march and led it to the champions league last season, but in a statement on its website today, chesley said recent performances and results were simply not good enough -- chelsea said recent performances and results were simply not good enough. i'm only a win will do. a draw would leave them having to leave their last match to get through. >> the squat look relaxed as they prepare for their match. they know that
to india and that have to do with a sequence of events that will take place after 2014 when the american focus once again as steve mentioned when the american focus becomes somewhat less the relationship through the counterterrorism and opens the door for the more creative ways of business, academic, a media that have really suffered in the last ten years. so i guess i come out to your question answering that i'm cautiously optimistic if we can keep things on the rail which you know what will happen over the last ten years isn't an easy thing and it's like rolling down the side do would be and you don't know how for the region goes so keeping things on track it isn't easy to keep things on track in pakistan because of the way that it's mismanaged and because of the difficulties in the relationship, but if we are able to do so i think after 2014, there will be a prospect that we could open up to new kinds of cooperation if we are not slaves to a bilateral mission that is based on this trust but if we focus on the multilateral and the regional issues that will ultimately lead to economic g
five years ago, we thought china and india and other emerging economies might sign on to emissions reduction and therefore if we reduced emissions, perhaps global temperatures would be reduced. i don't take a position on whether man-made emissions cause global warming are not, but if we are reducing emissions in china and india, which make up 37% of the worlds population are not doing so, we're not going to have any effect on global temperatures. in the first chapter of the book i talk about geoengineering solutions that nobel prize winning scientists paul crookston thinks could reduce global temperatures if we adjust honoring such as spurring water or painting rooms white to reflect the sun rays. what we are doing with the $12 billion they spent on alternative energy is pushing people into cars they don't want to buy. we are raising electricity costs. we are getting rid of incandescent light bulbs and fluorescent lightbulbs. the cost of this falls disproportionately on to those who are least able to afford it. the lowest of the income distribution according to recent data assessme
interested in how you describe the evolving relationship with india and china. what do you see as the qualitative differences between india and china? you described india as a strategic partnership. china is something else. there is more of an element of competition when you describe the relationship with china. this is nothing like that when you describe the relationship with india. is it too much for us in southeast asia to expect that one day there will be a strategic partnership between the u.s. and china? >> thank you. the relationship with india is rooted in history and it is rooted in a shared system of democracy. it is a unique relationship that we are building out. it has different aspects to it. their relationship with china is more complex. we are trying to build a relationship that is important to both nations in the world between two systems that are very different. working that through it is one of the great challenges we have. we are trying to build a relationship between the u.s. and china where there are elements of competition. we are trying to build a relatio
's relations with india, the issues that have to do with the sequence of events that will take place after 2014 when the american focus once again as steve mentioned, when the american focus becomes somewhat less a relationship through counterterrorism and opens the door for more creative ways of business, academic, media, other links with pakistan that have really suffered in the last 10 years because of our focus on ct pics i guess i come up to your question answering that i'm cautiously optimistic that if we can keep things on the risk in which if you know what happened over the last two years, it's not an easy thing, it was like rolling down the side of her routine with rocks and cactus is and you don't know how far the routine goes. so goes. so what is a keeping things on track, it is not easy to get things on track, pakistan. because of the way it's mismanaged, because of the difficulties in our relationship. but if we're able to do so i think after 2014 there would be a prospect that we can open up the new kind of cooperation, if we are not slaves to a bilateral vision, based on mistrust
down to maybe six, 7%. as you know this were at double digits. india is still about 6. and there are four or five countries that are well over five but they would have been, if we hadn't had all these problems they probably would have been much higher. >> uh-huh. >> but it's not like going to minus or at least even going to low single digits. >> it is the deacceleration that longer-term investors will point to as a worrisome trend. do you agree with that? >> of course. we have to watch it very, very carefully but at the end of the day if you look at the average for emerging markets, the average growth rate is 5%. >> uh-huh. >> so that's five times more than what the developments are doing. so when people ask me do you think we'll have a hard or soft landing in china they are-- 5, 6, 7% growth is very, very fast growth. >> are these economies developing themselves? so in other words, are they becoming less and less dependent on trade with the big economies like the united states and europe and more internally developed. >> that is really interesting because if you look
conservative individuals, and you don't think in pakistan, india and other nations that will soon already have the bomb, that those cool minds are going to determine what they do with them? >> that's right. and there are two senses of this. first of all, in the crisis it could get out of control for just those reasons. the other thing we're already starting to see the kind of arms race that we saw back in the cold war in the middle east in south asia, and in east asia. for example israel is shifting a good part of nuclear forces to see. now this it's a good thing to do. the iranians are countering by mobilizing missiles and fixed silos to launch. we could go into details but i'm trying to rise above this and point out there are already strong interactions in these military systems and regions. >> eliot: as the number of nuclear nations increases does the inevitability of a nuclear confrontation almost make you certain there will be in the next 30, 40, 50 years a nuclear war? >> i'm not that pessimistic. the problem is the nature of the country. if you tell me that japan were to get nuclear wea
online. today the u.s. economy accounts for 23% of the world's economy and india is 7. in 2030, according to the oecd predictions, china will be 29% of the world economy, the u.s. will be 18 and india will be 11. and those are, i think, really worthwhile numbers to keep in our mind as we talk about u.s. competitiveness in the world economy, because we're entering this entirely new era where the u.s. is going to be a big player in the world economy but no longer the preeminent, the very largest one, and i think that brings real challenges and requires a whole new way of thinking. so my opening remarks, steve was introduced, i think quite rightly, as a guy who i hope is getting cases of champagne and bouquets of flowers from the white house. because on certain readings you could say, you know, he's the guy who got the president reelected. that means, i believe, he has great insight into what obama's second term economic policy will be -- [laughter] and the big question on the agenda which i think certainly already tremendous bearing on u.s., on the u.s. domestic economy and, therefore, u.s.
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of an impact on sort of the distribution of goods as we see. there are bypasses being done through india, through japan, through china and also russia. but i do think ultimately the economy is faltering internally because of the government is able to buy as you reported and broke the story through reuters a couple weeks ago here they were getting one to $3 billion of gold into iran helping them bolster their cash. but on the other hand, goods they're buying are still not keeping up. they have 30% reduction in oil imports or exports rather. they're really suffering on things bringing inand out of the count. meliss how are they doing that? >> they're doing it through, number one, bringing in bullion from turkey and dubai. that brings in cash they need without having to deal in rials. india, japan and china purchasing 50%. their oil shipped through iranian ships orer flagships that e masking the fact that that oil is going to those countries. turkey has the pass through the sanctions of 180 delays they're still dealing with ir. russia, some defense systems they were using in the defense dri
in the countries, brazil, russia, india, bringing in europe, and do real nation building through economic means so you don't end up having a cold war with china or russia or entering a new gray war with al qaeda or intervention in syria or war with iran. let us hope those are not the foreign policy markers of a second term. he has a chance here. not for cold war with china, but to rebuild because china's going through terrible social instability, economic growth is plummeting. a whole series of issues to unit. >> it's worth mentioning the president announced the return of the u.s. to the tune of 170 million for projects over the next two years and that is something i'm sure the burmese welcome with open arms, but at the end of the day i think he probably could have gone with empty hands and still receive the reception he had which was people flooding the streets. reports of six and seven people deep on the sidewalks as his motorcade passed by. >> that's right. china has been offering a lot of cash, doing a lot of projects there. a lot of chinese business people in burma. china very much wants acce
the president ridiculed it as a sketchy deal. not so sketchy anymore. are the india of, well, taking a look at the tax expenditures and adjusting a few write offs and deductions. russian state media, apparently the source to turn to these days reporting president obama will be visiting russia after being invited by russian president vladimir kitchen. reportedly extended the invitation during a call to congratulate the president on his reelection. the date is not been agreed to. the white house has not confirmed the trip, so until then we are hitting the president's travel itinerary from the kremlin. up next to my general patraeus agrees to testify before congress behind closed doors. he spends a lot of time behind closed doors. igniting speculation he would contradict the white house. the "a-team" returns in just one moment. next. [ female announcer ] the next generation of investing technology is now within your grasp with the e-trade 360 investing dashboard. e-trade 360 is the world's first investing homepage that shows you where all your investments are and what they're doing with free s
, countries like china and india in the middle east will increase. the role that they will attempt to play is bound to increase, because debt supplies still comes from it. given the importance of the islamic world and the wealth that will accumulate in that region, there will be a continued interest in its stability. but the new security team here, what they will have to do is make a non-traditional assessment on the evolution to take place. some of this will depend on the period of 10 years to 15 years. will it be normal policy? or will the killer -- or will there be influence over what it will be? i expect that india will become a more active player in the region. >> dr. kissinger, earlier we were talking about a new country on the american foreign policy agenda. president obama is going there. something is happening. does it matter, is it important, how does it matter? >> burma has a very large population of resources being run by a military government. it is between india, china, and itself. it plays an important strategic role. china has been playing a considerable as it has not dealt
, india, indonesia, so the challenges are enormous. frankly, the strong leadership from the white house, secretary clinton, have been able to do a lot, and built on some of remarkable achievements of the previous administration, including the opening to india. i would -- those are the opportunities. for me, is challenges are the personal ones. i have a wife who is also a senior administration official, and we have young children, and try to balance, figuring out how to be in a certain place when you have got pressing either international or domestic family business is remarkably difficult. there is a letdown when you are not there in certain things, or the embarrassment when you're diplomatic interlocutor here's your daughter screaming at the top of her lungs as you are trying to sit and negotiate some aspect of an agreement. i would say, victor, i am not screaming, it is my daughter. it has happened the other way around. i would say if has been a remarkable, as you are going to each of our resume is an experiences, it has been an incredible ride pyrrhic is a wonderful thing. this is on
interests of countries like china and india in the middle east will increase and the role they will attempt to play is bound to increase because their supplies still become imported from at the same time, given the importance of the islamic world and what will accumulate in the region, continues to add interest in stability the new security team will have to do to make nontraditional assessment of heart they imagine the evolution -- and some of this will depend on the outcome of the election over the period of 10 to 15 years iran emerges as a country conducting normal publicity and will continue to be a country influenced with theological evolution. but that will be -- i expect china and india will become more active players in the region >> i will take the brunt of and ask one last question. we were talking earlier outside about a new country on the american foreign policy agenda, me and mar burma. president obama is going there. something is happening. is it important? how does it matter? >> burma is a country with a large population of potential resources, racked by a military government
'm from france. >> i was born in venezuela. >> south africa. >> hait. >> india. >> i'm from philippines. >> i'm from guinea, west africa. >> senegal. >> just like from many of our ancestors the road here has been long and the americans to become those americans has been recorded in decades, not years. >> 10 years ago. >> 12 years ago. >> 4 years ago. >> 20 years next month. >> i've lived here basically my whole life. >> 24 years. >> but wait they do to find their own american dream, each one deeply personal. >> my american dream is to become a fire fighter. >> my daughter at the school. >> my american dream has to become an american. >> to create my own leg. >> i to be a successful woman. >> to pursue the happiness. >> today that's my american dream. >> right now it means that eventually i'm going to get to vote. >> my american dream is to buy a house in maine. >> you don't have to become like a billionaire. it can be your own business. it can be your own dream. >> learning how democracy works. >> taking part in the rights i'm helping to defend. >> each story unique, but one word the sa
're searching citizens have a right to decide. all of europe, india, japan russia etc. >> eliot: it's terrifying that russia and china are ahead of us in terms of consumer disclosure. let us know if there is gmo in our food. what are the health effects of this genetically modified stuff. what is the science on that? how much data do we have that we can rely upon, we can't rely upon those who are marketing their own products. >> that is exactly the problem. the patent holders for these genetically modified crops they own these crops as i say they've been patented as uniquely theirs. the u.s. government does not require independent safety analysis for these crops to be approved. as you know perfectly well in washington where now $600 million has been sent by bio tech to lobby regulatory, to narrow the aperture for regulatory approval, it has basically been an industry-driven proposition. there have only been a couple of independent studies. one came out this summer, a peer review in france that smuggled genetically produced corn seed out of canada, and it was scary. i'm not arguing because of this
's in negative territory, in the he's, china, india, and about the only things that the rest of the world likes about america are movie, tv, science, and technology. they are not keen on the democracy, as least as america preaches it. heading now into another four years of the obama administration where are we, and why are we here, and how do we get somewhere else? how do we live up to that promise? what went wrong? what's going right? what can we do about it going forward? >> simple. [laughter] well, fist of all, i don't think that favorability ratinging in the surveys are evidence of whether we are doing something wrong or right, and it's a huge mistake for anybody who practices public diplomacy to think that his or her job is to win a popularity contest. while i guess maybe some of us in the bush administration can take a certain pleasure at the fact that in 2008 the favorability ratings for the united states were higher and four out of the five surveyed arab countries, i'm not going to bring that up. [laughter] no, but i think it -- i think it's a big mistake, and, you know, in my view, and
poor people in china and india into the middle class and one american drops out of the middle class, that is not such a bad trade, 4-1. i spoke to a cfo of a u.s. technology company and this is a person with a charming and lovely life story, his parents were immigrants and he told me his parents told him and his brother when they immigrated that they were temporarily for. imagine that, temporarily poor and sure enough complete rock stars, both of them went to new york. and the mass club, one brother in silicon valley and another is derivative on wall street. the technology cfo, his parents were really angry at him because he dropped out of a ph.d. program in applied math at stanford having gone to harvard to start becoming plutocrats. very hard-working guy, did smart, did great, this is what he said about the american middle-class. we are demand higher paycheck than the rest of the world. if you are going to demand ten times the paycheck you need to deliver ten times the value. it sounds harsh but maybe people of the middle-class need to decide to take a pay cut. similarly, less for
it in the middle east, also china, it india. -- also india. the things that the rest of the world likes about america are movies, tv, science, technology. they're not keen on democracy as america preaches it. heading into another four years of the obama administration, where are we, and why are we here, and how do we get somewhere else? what went wrong, what is going right, and what to do about it going forward? >> first of all, i do not think that favorability ratings and the pew surveys of evidence of whether we're doing something wrong or right. i think it is a huge mistake for anybody who practices public diplomacy to think that his or her job is to win a popularity contest. well i guess maybe some of us who were in the bush administration can take a certain pleasure in effect in 2008, the favorability ratings for the united states were higher in four out of the five surveyed arab countries -- i am not even going to bring that up. [laughter] and it is a big mistake. in my view, and what i tried to do during my short tenure as undersecretary, is try to focus attention on what public diplom
you for joining us. >>> here's a pop quiz. what comes from india, about the size of a domino, and has generated about a 150% return in less than 20 years? find out what we're talking about after a break. from currency trading for a few to a currency market for everyone. the potential of fxcm unlocked. nyse euronext. unlocking the world's potential. the potential of yelp unlocked. nyse euronext. unlocking the world's potential. who have used androgel 1%, there's big news. presenting androgel 1.62%. both are used to treat men with low testosterone. androgel 1.62% is from the makers of the number one prescribed testosterone replacement therapy. it raises your testosterone levels, and... is concentrated, so you could use less gel. and with androgel 1.62%, you can save on your monthly prescription. [ male announcer ] dosing and application sites between these products differ. women and children should avoid contact with application sites. discontinue androgel and call your doctor if you see unexpected signs of early puberty in a child, or, signs in a woman which may include changes in body
, canada, the allies, most democracies not israel, india, and other countries, but most are protocol one. in the mid-70 -- mid-80 #s, they used protocol one, the other didn't, changed sides and so on. the side you followed the rules, guess what? they lost the war game. during the 1990s, american lawyers and human rights watch and amnesty international charged the united states air force with serious violations of the laws of war during the bombing campaign in kosovo and yugoslavia bringing these before the tribunal for the former yugoslavia using one as the rules. amnesty internationals cry the failure to give effective warning before bombing. human rights watch complained the u.s. air force was too concerned with ensuring pilot safety. these are american writers writing this, complaining about the american air force, too worried about the safety of american service members. these are the global rules. people talk about global rules, these are the global rules. it's an example of transnational politics, a new kind of politics. the violations of the law of war were based on protocol one.
here as we see demand from china, from india, supportive of prices although, of course, gold following the markets. forecasts from barically's saying itth is the time to be overweight gold, unambiguously positive to have more qe. other metals to watch, palladium, certainly, biggest gaper of 4% on the session, big one-day for palladium, supply concerns out of russia and south africa, also supportive of the platinum market. if you want to play these metals as a retail investors, look at the etfs. >>> to the action here at the nyse, bob pisani here on the nyse floor. last words out of your mouth were much better that yesterday. what kind of steady as she goes? >> even on the vans decline line. volume is light to moderate a heck of a lot better that yesterday. best volume in a long time. and a very strong european close. that was the big factor, big speculation again about spain being involved in perhaps the ecb coming and buying spam nish bonds, all vague speculation but helped the spam nish close and the european close. here is sector up today for the first time this month, utility stock
that need to be stepping up to the plate and taking on more of your responsibilities. indonesia, india, brazil, turkey, south africa, but at the same time, we also hear the statements made that as they get involved and should step up to the plate in helping to nurture democracy come to protest human rights, but that they also have to make sure there roadhouses in order. what are your thoughts on that? >> certainly, more nations now have their role to play. definitely, in our case, we're trying to play a role based on our experience. as you might know, our country just 10, 20 years ago was always mentioned with drug trafficking and corruption and. that was the case. a more important message to leave before this panel is democracy is very important. it is important when the people really want to see their relations. with what happened in colombia, in our case, very strong, important leadership for municipal leaders and, at the same time, and national will to find a role has been critical. after that, then you find international support and cooperation. in the case of colombia, it is an i
with china and establishing new relations with india. he is in every sense the diplomat for year. what we most admire in our unified combatant commanders. so i want to say thank you, bill, to you for doing this and let's turn it over. [applause] >> dr. hamre thank you very much. while we are getting settled here, i will have our panelists, up and get settled into their chairs and order desert. for those of you that nist the chat line, it may be too late. [laughter] but then again, i don't think too many in this room are starving, not the same can be said for others in the world. i wanted to begin with first, in case you missed the copy of this on the way in, we recommend it to your reading and i would say to john and steve thanks for inviting me to participate here in this event and i will get into that in a minute on why i think it's important. i would also like to add my voice to the memory trip who contributed as he things to so many things in life to this effort just before he passed away, and quite a remarkable man as john indicated with an amazing list of accomplishments and a relat
traditional forms of national power. emerging powers like india and brazil are gaining clout because of their size, of course, but more the size of their economies than of their military. more about the potential of their markets than their projection of what we used to think of as power. meanwhile, the global economic system, open, free, transparent, and fair, that fueled unprecedented growth is now under unprecedented pressure. trade imbalances, new forms of protectionism, the rise of state capitalism, and crippling public debt. finally, the traditional sources of america's global leadership are in need of renewal. a task for all of us. the cottage industry of cassandras and declinists have dramatically overstated this case, but it is true that the reservoirs of good will that we build up around the world during the 20th century will not and cannot last forever. new generations of young people do not remember gi's liberating their countries, or american development assistance changing the face of their economies were literally saving generations from hunger and disease. they are mo
of western europe, canada, most of our allies, most democracies -- not israel, india and some other countries -- but most countries are due to adhere to protocol i. during the '80s the united states conducted a series of war games, they changed sides and so on and the side that you follow protocol i rules, guess what? they always lost the war game. during the 1990s at amnesty international charged the united nations -- charged the united states air force with serious violations of the laws of war during the bombing campaigns in kosovo and yugoslavia. they brought these charges before a u.n.-sponsored international criminal tribunal for the former yugoslavia which uses protocol i, so amnesty international decried the consistent failure to give effective warning to civilians before bombing. human rights watch complained that the u.s. air force was too concerned with insuring pilot safety. these were american lawyers writing this, complaining about the american air force, too worried about the safety of american service members. so these are the global rules. when people talk about global rules,
, india or brazil right now. they're using a mobile phone primarily to access it because they haven't had an access to a broadband p.c. or laptop. there isn't an infrastructure of media that you have in the u.s. so a lot of americans will meet me and say facebook is combreat for gossiping and see what my friends are eating for lunch. but if you were to talk to somebody in the middle east you'd hear a different story which is that facebook was providing access to news to people that had unique access to information that they weren't able to get it otherwise and you get a much more sort of meaty story about what facebook means to them. >> more from facebook engineer chris cox with an insider's view of the company, thanksgiving day on c-span. at 12:00 chief justice john roberts and at 10:ooh, we pay tribute to neil armstrong just before 11:00. >> live coverage here tomorrow on c-span. we'll look at immigration policy at the american enterprise institute. speakers include richard lamb of the sournl baptist convention. that's at sock a.m. eastern. then the c.e.o. of the new york stock exchange
india and africa. biolight hopes the same technology that has caught on with campers will catch fire across the world. >>> good morning, new york. a beautiful shot of a beautiful sky there. just a few clouds. folks are waking up there. 8:22 on the east coast. 5:22 out west. thanks for watching this morning. >> actor larry hagman has died. his family says the 81-year-old actor was surrounded by family members at the end. they also say he was happy to end his career by resurrecting his favorite character, j.r. ewing. cnn's colleen mcedwards has more now on hagman's career and the role that made him a household name. >> reporter: larry hagman wore many hats in his career, but is best known for the stetson he wore on "dallas." despite roles on film and on stage, hagman will always be remembered as the villainous j.r. ewing. >> and you drove cliff to attempt suicide? >> how was i to know he was going to do a dumb thing like that. >> reporter: when j.r. was shot by an enknown assailant it became one of the most famous cliffhangers in tv history, watched by 300 million people from all aroun
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